Using Powershell to clean up the animations your LaTeX file

In a previous post, I talked how to animate your Beamer presentations and how to print them as slides and article for the audience. One problem with a presentation with animations is that every element of an animation means one more slide. If you want to give the presentation to the audience so they can write on their slides using their ipad or touch screen notebook, they will complain that only one of the animated slides is complete.

The easiest way to remedy this, replace all overlays, \pause, etc. from your LaTeX file and print it like this. One could do this easily in Emacs and write a macro for this. This time I chose another way to do this using Powershell, the awesome windows scripting language.

First, I define a function that will show me a file picker. Then I will use this file picker to get the LaTeX-file that should be cleaned up. From the file chosen, I save the path in a variable $FolderPath and get the name of the file. This information is used to save the file as the original name with “_NA” (for no animation).

Then I read the content and replace all occurences of \pause, <+-.> <digit-> and \only by a space using regular expressions. After this I save the file in the original place using the _NA-addition. The only thing I had problems with was the encoding (Powershell saved it in the wrong format), so I had to add “–Encoding Default” as option.

That’s all. Of course, this could be done with any scripting language.

Tricks with Beamer: Animations and Print-Outs

If you use Beamer for presentations, you might want to use “animations”: either show list elements successively or build up a diagram. Beamer has some nice possibilities for doing this:

  • In lists (enumerate, itemize) you can use the overlays. Just add <1-> after the first \item and this item will show up first. For the second item you just add <2->, etc. You can also let them disappear again by giving a range (e.g. <2-3>, which means that this item will appear at the second and third slide, but will disappear again after that. If you want all the list elements to appear one after another and you don’t want do write down the elements one by one, you can use [<+->] just after your \begin{itemize}.
  • For other parts you can use \pause.
  • For diagrams made with tikz, you can enclose the parts of the diagram using \only<1->{ draw commands } with the same syntax as the overlays mentioned above. 

  If I give a lecture, I use a trick by Tom Rutherford, to print out my presentation in slides- and article form. My lecture is always in the file lecture.tex. I than have two additional tex files: beamer.tex and print.tex for producing pdf-files in slide- and article format. This way, students can either use the slides and write on them using their ipad, or use the article and print it out for in class.

The files look like this for the slides:

and for the article:

And here are the first pages:

beamer

article