LaTeX


  • Using Powershell to clean up the animations your LaTeX file

    In a previous post, I talked how to animate your Beamer presentations and how to print them as slides and article for the audience. One problem with a presentation with animations is that every element of an animation means one more slide. If you want to give the presentation to the audience so they can write on their slides using their ipad or touch screen notebook, they will complain that only one of the animated slides is complete.

    The easiest way to remedy this, replace all overlays, \pause, etc. from your LaTeX file and print it like this. One could … Read the rest “Using Powershell to clean up the animations your LaTeX file”

  • Tricks with Beamer: Animations and Print-Outs

    If you use Beamer for presentations, you might want to use “animations”: either show list elements successively or build up a diagram. Beamer has some nice possibilities for doing this:

    • In lists (enumerate, itemize) you can use the overlays. Just add <1-> after the first \item and this item will show up first. For the second item you just add <2->, etc. You can also let them disappear again by giving a range (e.g. <2-3>, which means that this item will appear at the second and third slide, but will disappear again after that. If you want all the list
    Read the rest “Tricks with Beamer: Animations and Print-Outs”

  • Note taking with LaTeX for learning

    Summarizing a text book is easy in LaTeX, but sometimes I want to learn the summarized text. Reading the summary over and over again is not very efficient, so I came up with the typical solution, where you can hide the main part of the summary and can check your knowledge by asking yourself questions based on keywords in the margin. Here is an example, where I started summarizing the R package data.table:

    image

    Now I use hide the main text and can ask myself the questions:

    • Express the data.table in SQL-form?
    • How to create a data.table?

    Add the following to … Read the rest “Note taking with LaTeX for learning”

  • Using file templates in Emacs

    A good practice in modeling is to place information related to the project your are working on, the subject, the data and your personal information like E-mail address at the top of your file. In Emacs you can define skeleton functions that will prompt for the information and put it in the file. Below is an example for a file with as comment symbol “**: (the $Id: $ is for my version control system, that automatically will add the information on the last commit in this line).

    image

    Below you see how to make a function using skeleton. As I don’t … Read the rest “Using file templates in Emacs”

  • Using Preview for LaTeX documents in Emacs

    Editing LaTeX documents with lots of equations can be sometimes hard if you want to refer to the equations in the text. You can use, if you have a big monitor, put the compiled file to the right of your editor, but on a notebook this is not a good option. If you use AucTex in Emacs, you can use the preview mode.

    image

    Here is the text without preview in Emacs And here it is with preview.

    image

    You can set the display options in the Option Group “AucTex” under “Preview Appearance”. One more thing: I always compile to pdf (not … Read the rest “Using Preview for LaTeX documents in Emacs”


Categories

Name *

Email *